Thursday, August 21, 2014

45% of Boys Think Porn Helps You Learn About Sex

The Opinium survey of 18-year-olds commissioned by the UK-based Institute for Public Policy Research paints a bleak picture of teenage life where 80% of young girls and boys said it was too easy to stumble across explicit images and videos on the internet. Almost half (46%) said the phenomenon of “sexting,” where people send explicit pictures of themselves to others, was “part of everyday life for teenagers nowadays.” And a majority said pornography was making life harder for adolescents. Two-thirds of girls and almost half of boys said it would be “easier growing up if pornography was less easy to access for young people.” 70% said watching porn was seen as normal among their classmates at school. One in 10 said it had become common among their peers by the age of 11. More than half (55%) said they had stumbled across images that made them “worried or uncomfortable” while surfing the internet. Just one in 10 told their parents about the episodes. Worst of all: almost half of boys (45%) said porn helped young people “learn about sex,” compared to just 30% of girls. Some 16% said their main source of information about sex and relationships was pornographic websites, with another 26% identifying the internet as a major source.



4 comments:

  1. The parents need to teach their children properly. I guess they are too busy watching porn.

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  2. This is so sad. More than the statistics, this is about entire generations never knowing the beauty of true intimacy, but instead indulging in a incomplete, mindless, purposeless kind of sexuality as they have been taught by porn. Divorces, dysfunctional kids, substance abuse, abortions, promiscuity, STDs,…it is all bound to happen to these young people. Nothing good can come out of this pornification. The fabric of society is unraveling. May the Lord help us to speak out against this madness.

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  3. Thanks for sharing Joseph. It is actually heartbreaking to read this. Although, I remember that when I was in middle school, some guys were talking about pornography and saying that they watched it to learn about sex. Well first of all, why do middle schoolers need to know how to have sex? Second off, porn really has become socially acceptable to even talk about amongst peers and that's sad. 13 year olds, or in the case of the study, 11 year olds shouldn't be exposed to such things. Thirdly, pornography is probably the last thing you want to look at if you really want to know what true sex is all about. So back in middle school I didn't really understand the concept of porn but I just knew that I didn't want to look at it. I didn't even know that Catholic church teaching was against it! Well, so I didn't care much about it back then but now I think it's disappointing. I'm not saying I'm perfect because I know I've had my struggles but to say that all these lustful things are acceptable and good is like I said: disappointing. If so many children are exposed to it then what does that say about our future generation? Well, I'd like to know what you think, Joseph: what can we do to reach out to people? What do we do so that people know that it's wrong. Do you think that they know already, somewhere deep down? Like how I knew that I didn't want to know about it but I didn't think it was wrong? If we expose people to the truth, will it make them uncomfortable enough to look for the truth?

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    Replies
    1. In terms of porn, which still remains a primarily male problem, boys are clearly not being well-formed by their fathers. In other words, boys must look up to their dads as models of masculine purity and morality; if dad is doing it, then the son will inevitably follow in those footsteps.

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